Author Topic: Networking Issues  (Read 1882 times)

jpmswiss

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Networking Issues
« on: May 08, 2007, 12:20:17 pm »
Well I am happy to say that I finally got the basic installation to work!

Now its time to get the wireless Linux MCE going and I have a couple of n00b questions about networking:

1. Internet WLAN
Linksys ADSL Router with 4 port switch connected to a Linksys WRT54G WLAN router connected to PC.
DHCP turned OFF.
No major problems here, though some XP machines not taking fixed ip addresses; dhcp no problem.
I also have a Linksys WRE54G range expander with auto configuration.

2. Linux MCE WLAN
At the moment no WLAN hardware, so it's time to go shopping!
Is it enough just to get an Access point or should I get a router?
Any suggestions?

Sorry for the rookie questions.

Thanks.

sharlee_angelo

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Re: Networking Issues
« Reply #1 on: May 08, 2007, 02:06:12 pm »
linuxmce can work as a router and dhcp server.
Read the F****** Logs!!!

rmwlaw

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Re: Networking Issues
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2007, 06:04:07 am »
linuxmce can work as a router and dhcp server.

Not to hijack your guidance to John here, but, in the system that I am planning, I already have a wireless router acting as a DHCP server (WAF - wife and kids have to have wireless internet access through 2-story concrete house, with concrete walls and slab between 2 levels, so cannot shut off the wireless router). Could I used a wired network (possibly 1 of the new network using AC powerlines in home) with linuxmce while having a DSL adapter card in the same computer acting as my linuxmce hybrid server? Do I need a physical router for this configuration for linuxmce to communicate with other devices, or is it a software solution which obviates the need for an actual physical router device.

Sorry if I have hijacked this thread, but the possibilities of your post fascinate my imagination!

Richard in south Florida

sharlee_angelo

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Re: Networking Issues
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2007, 01:02:06 pm »
well, if i said that linuxmce could work as a router and a dhcp server, you don't need any hardware devices for this. maybe you must add some extra rules in linuxmce firewall to allow acces for other computers to internet.
Read the F****** Logs!!!

rmwlaw

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Re: Networking Issues
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2007, 02:25:49 pm »
well, if i said that linuxmce could work as a router and a dhcp server, you don't need any hardware devices for this. maybe you must add some extra rules in linuxmce firewall to allow acces for other computers to internet.

I am sorry but I do not understand your answer. Are you saying that I will not need a router (the actual physical box) after installing linuxmce, in order for my planned hybrid server to communicate with the other pcs in my planned system? Or are you saying that I will still need a router?

Richard

MasterC

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Re: Networking Issues
« Reply #5 on: May 09, 2007, 10:38:55 pm »
Your wireless network has nothing to do with a DHCP server or router.  Wireless connectivity != wireless router.  Your wireless router (I assume) can (typically, any I've encountered) be switched into Access Point (WAP) mode.  This turns off the routing functions of the device and turns it into a wireless "relay" of the network.  So, the wireless devices still connect to it, and in turn receive things like private IP addresses from your DHCP server (that will be built into your LinuxMCE device).  Using DD-WRT as an example (because I have it and it's easy to reference :D ) you can use the device as a DHCP-forwarder (the terminology DD-WRT uses) instead of a DHCP server.

HTH

-Chad

MasterC

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Re: Networking Issues
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2007, 08:32:23 am »
To expand a bit (and pulling from a PM I received):

An internet connection comes into your house (using DSL as the example) through your phone line.  You plug that into a modem (that may also be a router) which connects you to your ISP.  The modem/router will typically have a DHCP server built in.  Access your router config (using something like http://192.168.0.1 ; 10.0.0.1 or 192.168.1.1 depending on the brand and instructions) and turn off the built in DHCP server.  If you have already done this because you put a separate router on your network (by connecting your modem/router to a new router) then you will simply disable the DHCP function in this new router (similarly to how you did previously).  At that point your new router (ambiguously termed router refers to both wired and wireless routers) that was performing the job of a DHCP server will continue to perform all other functions including serving up the 'net wirelessly.  Often times one of the configuration options are instead to change the device to a DHCP-Forwarder (which in simple terms means to disable the DHCP server in that device).  That choice would be just fine, it just depends on the terminology your router uses; both turning off the DHCP server (Disable DHCP Server) and enabling DHCP-Forwarder are the same thing (similarly glass and cup represent the same thing).

Slightly more advanced network setups might include 2 wireless routers that "wirelessly bridge" a connection.  The same would hold true in this network arrangement.  One of the wireless routers will likely be offering a DHCP server currently.  You would simply disable that server, the wireless bridge will remain intact. 

The terms that seem to be most confusing are relating to routing.  A router is a slightly more sophisticated device that 'routes' packets to their destination.  Often times (and with newer equipment) switches will contain a bit of 'intelligence' that also routes packets to their destination which really helps to confuse and blur the lines of router/switch.  So, a wireless *router* (when referring to home networking) is simply a router with built in wireless capabilities.  A non-wireless router is simply a router with a built in switch (again just talking home networking equipment, industrial stuff may differ, but the idea is the same).  A hybrid router (most often what you buy) is a wired router, a 4-8 port wired switch and wireless access point all in 1 device. 

The same thing applies to every one of those devices.  If you have multiple devices, you should have already disabled 1 or more DHCP servers anyway; and if you haven't, do it :)  In a really lame diagram, here is what it might look like:

--->DSL Modem/router (DHCP disabled)---->Wireless Router---->wireless devices
                                                                 |
                                                                  ------->wired devices
                                                                 |
                                                                  ------->other wireless or wired routers (with DHCP disabled)

That second device that everything is connected to; that *should* be the only device in your network running a DHCP server (and if it's not, get your network setup so it is).  Once you are ready to install LinuxMCE, disable that single DHCP server that was performing the DHCP functions for the entire house.  Then, when you install LinuxMCE on your core machine (that is probably wired to one of your routers, preferably your main router via a gigabit connection) it will begin performing the DHCP server functions.

HTH

-Chad

MasterC

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Re: Networking Issues
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2007, 08:37:49 am »
Well I am happy to say that I finally got the basic installation to work!

Now its time to get the wireless Linux MCE going and I have a couple of n00b questions about networking:

1. Internet WLAN
Linksys ADSL Router with 4 port switch connected to a Linksys WRT54G WLAN router connected to PC.
DHCP turned OFF.
No major problems here, though some XP machines not taking fixed ip addresses; dhcp no problem.
I also have a Linksys WRE54G range expander with auto configuration.

2. Linux MCE WLAN
At the moment no WLAN hardware, so it's time to go shopping!
Is it enough just to get an Access point or should I get a router?
Any suggestions?

Sorry for the rookie questions.

Thanks.

You already have a wireless router (and range expander) with the WRT54G.  A WAP (wireless access point) would just add more wireless "expansion" to your home.  If you need that, then go for it.  It sounds like you just need a wireless *adapter* though.  That would be something like a USB dongle or a PCI card; not a "blue box" you plug into your wall.  Brands that often work well with Linux (but aren't guaranteed) are TrendNet and Linksys.  If you are thinking of plugging your system into a wireless device (often referred to as a gaming adapter) then that would work just as well (it's basically the same idea as using a USB dongle or PCI card, but it connects to your PC through the Ethernet port).

Good luck.

-Chad

jpmswiss

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Re: Networking Issues
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2007, 08:14:54 pm »
You already have a wireless router (and range expander) with the WRT54G.  A WAP (wireless access point) would just add more wireless "expansion" to your home.  If you need that, then go for it.  It sounds like you just need a wireless *adapter* though.  That would be something like a USB dongle or a PCI card; not a "blue box" you plug into your wall.  Brands that often work well with Linux (but aren't guaranteed) are TrendNet and Linksys.  If you are thinking of plugging your system into a wireless device (often referred to as a gaming adapter) then that would work just as well (it's basically the same idea as using a USB dongle or PCI card, but it connects to your PC through the Ethernet port).

Good luck.

-Chad


Hi Chad

On behalf of all of us Linux newbies - thanks a lot for your thorough and "patient" explanation.
I ordered a Linksys PCI-Card this morning!
One thing is for sure - I am not putting another dime into this system until I get some results out of it!

Cheers
John